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Posts tagged “Rifle Hunting

Tactical Hunting: Sir, Yes, Sir!

Much to the dismay of piers morgan, diane Feinstein and willie nelson

(names intentionally not capitalized out of respect… or lack thereof)

By Kevin Reese

BR10-smMy pop once told me I might fit into my dress blues if I used bungee cords; the truth hurts. Looking at me it’s hard to believe I spent eight years in the Marines. In all honestly, I’m not that bad off… I’m just not that well off; I could stand a few months of nonstop treadmill work. Beyond reminiscing about my life as a Marine and wishing I still looked the part, I miss many aspects of active duty life – chief among them being camaraderie and my trusty M-16 A2 Service Rifle.

I wasn’t a huge promoter of 62-grain 5.56 Ball NATO ammunition but it seemed to be sufficient. I qualified every year as a rifle expert and later in my second enlistment as a pistol sharpshooter, qualifying with an original Colt 1911 that had been in Marine Corps service for over 75 years and was still a sweet shooter.

Kevin 3d SRIG-editedAssimilating to civilian life, including civilian shooting was a tall order. On the firing line, I had difficulty adjusting to traditional hunting rifles. I began looking at AR-15 rifles to regain that comfort level I had with my M-16 A2. As an avid hunter on an extremely tight budget, I recall how badly I wanted to purchase one of the Colt AR-15’s I drooled over as I passed by them in the PX. It looked exactly like my M-16 but was semi-automatic; it even had the bayonet stud. Perhaps I arrived at my justification before my time but I thought, back in the late 80’s, the AR-15 would make a great hunting rifle. Certainly, when I was honorably discharged in 1996 and searching for that comfort level I had achieved with my M-16 A2, the AR-15 was my only reasonable option.

chriskevinSeveral years ago, good friend and fellow Marine Corps veteran, Chris Reed, History Channel’s Top Shot season 2 winner, talked about his desire to do more tactical-styled hunting. We talked about tactical hunting often and he eventually restored my fervor for AR platform rifles, something I hadn’t experienced in years. I had been too immersed in bowhunting to stop and realize my passion for modern sporting rifles had slowed to a low-crawl. in the end, I can thank Chris for drawing that passion back to the surface once again, this time for the long haul.

Long range Bolt Action by Kevin ReeseWhile I still bowhunt religiously, I have expanded once again to rifle shooting. My CZ-USA Model 3 .300 WSM is back in the game and more importantly, so is my Smith & Wesson (S&W) MP15T Tactical 5.56. For long range shooting, my Alpen Apex 6-24x50mm scope is the only way to go and I’ve dialed my S&W MP15T Tactical in at 600 yards; however, here in Texas most shots are much closer and my routine hog hunting is predominantly at night.

That said, my AimPoint H34S Hunter is the perfect lowlight/night optic for hunting and shooting within 300 yards and now rests atop my AR-15. The Alpen Apex scope, trusted for long distances precision accuracy, reclaimed its 600+ yard throne to reign over my CZ-USA . Both are topped with HHA Optimizer Horizon mounts. The Horizon allows me to calibrate for bullet drop out to 600 yards and is incredibly accurate. Once the Horizon is calibrated I simply dial in the range within 5 yards, up to 600 yards out, and put the crosshairs on target; there is no need for hold-over or mil-dots. I’ve also outfitted my S&W MP15T with a Crimson Trace Rail Master CMR-201 Laser smithwessonmp15t-2and Hawglite Helios H250. The Helios H250 is a rail-mounted lighting system with a remote switch that delivers a blinding red, green or white led light with a remote switch I’ve attached to the handguard. I also ordered a Harris bipod from Brownell’s to round out my tactical hunting rifle and have since set out on a series of new adventures that send memories of days gone by flooding back into my brain-housing-group.

Like many of our Sportsman Elite loyalist, I cut my teeth shooting every can I could as a kid and honed my skills with military training that has carried over well into my hunting success. More importantly, it broadened my perspective on modern sporting rifles like the AR-15 and the diverse ways we can employ them for self-defense as well as recreational shooting and hunting.

smithwessonmp15tI’ve heard arguments on both sides of the fence, from Piers Morgan backers like Willie Nelson who believes semi-automatic AR-15’s should only be used by military and police (I’ve since thrown all my Willie albums in the trash – sorry I just can’t stomach his position on gun ontrol!), to the well-thought-out ideology of our Lone Star State Senator, Ted Cruz, who educated a nearly catatonic diane feinstein on the differences between a semi-automatic rifle that happens to be black and a bolt action rifle… rather the lack of differences between them!

BHbipod5My pop also once told me “You’ve got to stand for something or you’ll fall for anything” – well, he told me many things and I tried to remember the important ones. This is an issue I do take a stand on. I choose to roll my eyes and the irresponsible of ramblings of people like Morgan, Nelson and feinstein (I never dreamed that I would group Willie with California’s waste of a senate seat – Willie’s always been wasted anyway) while I stand with my brothers-and-sisters-in-arms who undoubtedly would love to venture into the hunting woods with an AR-platform rifle that, while offering only a single-shot firing option, does cater to those creature comforts we identify with through service to our beloved country. It’s also worth mentioning that a while back, California senator, Leland Yee, a staunch supporter of gun control even arguing for outright gun bans was arrested and indicted on serious gun-trafficking charges. What’s wrong with that picture?

Read more about Senator Yee here:

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2014/03/26/california-state-senator-arrested-in-fbi-sweep/

So, what’s my message to my fellow Navarro County hunters and shooting enthusiasts on AR-15’s and other modern sporting rifles in the woods? Take ‘em if you got ‘em! I choose to unify our front rather than divide our ranks with ignorant rhetoric and feinstein fascism. I suppose my position came with the commitment to uphold our Second Amendment, along with every other word in the Constitution, unlike some other folks. Of course, I also happen to believe an AR-15 is perfect for more than personal defense, it’s also great for hog and predator hunting!

comeandtakeitThat “Come and take it” perspective was born from military training and the knowledge that “we the people” rule the roost. Equally as important, it came from my proactive approach to real freedom. Whether you choose to shoot a bow, bolt action rifle, AR-15, 1911, revolver, muzzleloader or even Crosman’s ridiculously cool Benjamin Rogue .357-Caliber Air Rifle, get out there and do it! While you’re out there, thank every past and present warrior in our nation’s illustrious history for preserving your right to do so!

Hunt hard, hunt often and hunt with a modern sporting rifle like the AR-15, or better yet, with an ol’ Remington 700 BDL .300 resurrected with a McRees Prescision BR10 Chassis if that’s what turns your rotors! Whatever you choose, just get out there, enjoy God’s creation and eat well.

BR10-3-edited

A standard Remington bolt action rifle fitted with a HUNT READY McRees Precision BR10 Chassis (www.McReesPrecision.net)

 

 


Deer Hunting: Late Season is a Game Changer

By Kevin Reese

Christmas Credit Where It’s Due… Before we talk late season hunting, Kelly, Jacob and I would like to wish you and your families the merriest of Christmases this year. Our prayer through this holiday season is simply that you know, understand and embrace the Reason for the season. Make a simple birthday song your newest Christmas tradition. Santa is one cool cat but not nearly as awesome as the Lion and the Lamb. Give credit where it’s due this Christmas and commit random acts of kindness.

That said, let’s talk hunting…

Mike Kormos, Editor at the Corsicana Daily Sun, in Corsicana, TX, takes a nice 8-pt. buck!

Corsicana, Texas resident, Mike Kormos and a nice 8-Pt.

Late season deer hunting, fraught with the challenges of downright cold temps and bucks that have decided the nightlife is better for their health. Too often, it seems, deer lockdown after the rut, while does still dot the landscape on occasion, bucks have wised-up and don’t care nearly as much about the does as they did weeks earlier. Food sources change, too. Acorns are on the ground, others sources have dried up or gone… the changing season seems to change EVERTHING we know about deer hunting from the early season through the rut.

I often remind people that the definition of insanity is to do the same thing over and over and expect different results. Consistently hunting an area, or hunting it the same way is never a good idea; after all, if food sources, activity, temperatures and down-and-dirty deer behavior (rut) have all changed, why wouldn’t you change the way and places you hunt?

It’s easy for us to get stuck in a routine; it’s a path of least resistance – we don’t have to change anything – same Bat channel, same Bat time. Unfortunately the fault in our logic often is that as much as we think we have deer patterned, by mid-season they have likely patterned us; they know the paths we take to our stands or blinds and know where those setups are located. You might get the surprise of your life if you change the setup. More than once, simple changes have been the difference between seeing nothing… AGAIN, and killing the buck of a lifetime.

Consider trading in your regular spot for something less expected. Don’t be afraid to scout and find prospective areas during a quiet, scent controlled mid-day browse but stay away from known bedding areas and keep your bow or rifle with you – you just never know – stranger things have happened. Consider predominant winds when you find signs of deer activity like scat, scrapes, hoof prints, rubs, etc. Set up your blind or stand on the downwind side of observed activity. After setting up a stand or blind in a new location stay out of the area for several days, if possible, before returning to hunt.

Consider what it is exactly you are hunting over and whether interest in those food and water sources change as temperatures drop, acorns fall and the season progresses. How does the change from fall to winter alter activity and food sources? Are they rutting? Is that trail if front of your setup still used? Is water close by? Is it still their first or only choice? Use changes in weather and activity as the measuring stick you use to grade the effectiveness of your current position. Is it time to change your game? When deer have disappeared, your only option is to find out where they went.

Hunt funnels, pinch points, water sources, trails and areas with heavy acorn concentration or other desirable food sources; ask any hunter sitting over a feeder what happens when the acorns fall. In short, those changes must define where and how you hunt. Hunting over active sign as the season progresses makes infinitely more sense than sticking to the same old setup because you saw a buck working a scrape in early October. The lesson here is, “The only constant is change.”

A lack of success spanning the season can be more than frustrating; it can be downright mentally and physically draining. Human nature, if not kept in check, is to see your cup half empty. Pessimism is a hunter, too. It invades your thoughts and manipulates your decisions. Remember how many times Thomas Edison learned how NOT to make a light bulb? You may remember my pop’s best advice; I’ve made mention of it many times, “If you ask a thousand girls to dance, one of ’em’s gonna’ say, ‘Yes.’” There is nothing truer in our pursuit of wild game although there are times you must change the way you ask the question or approach the “girl”. Often, your biggest hurdle is yourself. Be a warrior against pessimism and a champion of tenacity. Attitude is everything; it either keeps you indoors or pushes you in the woods for another day of celebrating our outdoor heritage no matter the odds or the outcome. “You can’t win if you don’t play!” I’ll see you in the woods.

Hunt hard, hunt often.

TIPS FOR A GREAT HUNTING PHOTO: Be in natural settings, not in the back of a truck or a garage floor. Clean up as much blood as you can. RESPECT THE ANIMAL. Keep rifle barrels pointed away from people. Take the photo from a lower position… your deer will grow! Consider if you would frame the photo and place it on your mantle. If you would, great! If not, take the time to get it right.

Brian Beauchamp Buck 2014-sm

 


NEW BENJAMIN MARAUDER NOW AVAILABLE

PCP Air Rifle Built in America

 

For Immediate Release

Contact:  Laura Evans
Crosman Corporation
7629 Routes 5 & 20
Bloomfield, NY 14469
1-800-7AIRGUN

levans@crosman.com

Click here to visit Crosman.com!ROCHESTER, New York, (November 5, 2013) – Crosman Corporation announces availability of the Benjamin® Marauder®, the latest generation of its precharged pneumatic (PCP) air rifles for hunters and shooters, in .177, .22 and .25 calibers and featuring a synthetic stock and increased performance. An upgraded valve delivers a stunning 20% increase in shot count and increases power while delivering consistent velocities from the first trigger pull to the last.  The all-weather synthetic stock includes an adjustable comb for a customizable fit and was designed in concert with an improved trigger position for comfortable carry in the field. The new Marauder adds an integrated Resonance Dampener to the rifle’s popular sound suppression system that includes a full barrel shroud.

“The Benjamin brand is known for feature-rich products and the Marauder is a gun hunters will love to shoot. Enjoy a lot of trigger time with over 30 shots per fill in .177 and .22 calibers and 17 shots with the .25 caliber,” says Crosman Product Manager, Tom Clark. “The Marauder is an airgun for serious hunters that is capable of taking game as large as fox, turkeys and coyotes and quiet enough to take multiples from a single stand,” he said.

The new stock makes the rifle lighter than previous editions, and the comb provides 1.5 inches of adjustability to accommodate most any shooter.  The trigger has been moved rearward, and with a change in the grip angle and the redesigned stock, there is less hand and arm fatigue when carrying the rifle. The bolt is ambidextrous to accommodate left or right-handed shooters and the newly designed breech provides a more stable platform for larger scopes.

“It’s an all new experience that preserves the value advantage that has been the Marauder’s hallmark since its introduction in 2009”, added Clark. “The features and performance of this new Marauder rival those of PCP guns costing thousands more, and when you consider the low cost of airgun ammunition, it’s easy to see why the Marauder has quickly become the airgun for serious hunters and shooters.”

Click here to visit Crosman online!The Marauder has a two-stage, adjustable, match-grade trigger and an innovative multi-round magazine for fast follow-up shots. Depending on the caliber, muzzle velocities range from 900 to 1,100 feet per second (fps).  Foot pounds of energy (fpe) ranges from 21, with .177 caliber, to 32 fpe with .22 caliber and 50 fpe with .25 caliber.

The Benjamin Marauder in .177 and .22 calibers, have an MSRP of $620 and the MSRP of the .25 caliber is $660.  They are available now.

For additional information on the Benjamin Marauder  PCP air rifles, or on any Crosman, Benjamin, CenterPoint product, Crosman Archery, or Game Face Airsoft products, visit the company’s Web sites at www.crosman.com, www.centerpointhunting.com, www.gamefaceairsoft.com, or write to Laura Evans, Marketing Coordinator, Crosman Corporation, 7629 Routes 5 & 20, Bloomfield, NY 14469, email her at levans@crosman.com, or call her at (800) 7 – AIRGUN (724-7486).

For up-to-the-minute news from Crosman Corporation, follow us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/crosmancorp) and Facebook (http://facebook.com/crosmancorp).

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Rochester, N.Y.-based Crosman Corporation is an international designer, manufacturer and marketer of Crosman® and Benjamin® airguns, CenterPoint® optics, and Crosman®, Game Face, and Undead Apocalypse® airsoft products. Crosman is a licensee of U.S. Marine Corps airsoft and U.S. Army airsoft.

 


Blackhawk! Sportster™ TraverseTrack™ Bipod!

Finally, a hunter-friendly bipod!

By Kevin Reese

Click here to visit OpticsPlanet.com!The obstinate Texas sun forced me further into the shaded recesses of an outcropping of oak trees along the edge of a field of coastal grass. Stretched before me was some 50 acres of heavily rooted soil with isolated clumps of grass, certainly too few to bail and monetize. The population of feral hogs in the area generating this damage had only been defined by the landowner as “thick”.

Hours later, as the sun’s oppression finally submitted to dropping temperatures and a darkening sky, a sounder of hogs flooded into the field on my left. I steadied behind my Smith & Wesson MP15T Tactical 5.56 AR-15 topped by an Aimpoint H34S Hunter red dot scope as the hogs continued to rush toward an area of the field quite a distance to my right. As they crossed in front of me, I attempted to plant my reticle on any hog offering a shot opportunity. Unfortunately, none of the hogs stopped, even after I noisily attempted to capture their attention long enough to get a shot. They ignored me and continued to traverse from left to right.

In the end, none of the hogs offered an opportunity; worse, when I attempted to track them from left to right, the legs of my bipod bulldozed the soil, prohibiting me from getting the shot opportunity I was after. I moved the bipod into another position on my right and attempted to acquire a target once more but they continued, making an ethical shot impossible.

I’m not the only increasingly frustrated hunter using restrictive bipods. As a hog hunter and hog hunting seminar instructor, I hear and read of failed hunts often and routinely meet others hoping for an alternative. Personally, I’ve spent hours searching for a swivel bipod  only to find that “swivel” simply means the vertical pivot that allows a rifle to be held vertically straight or rested on its side at an angle. By in large, I’ve found that “Swivel” DOES NOT mean the ability to swing or track targets moving from left to right – the very functionality we require as hunters using bipods.

As important as functionality, I need a bipod to be durable and dependable; in short, trustable. As a Special Hog Weapons and Tactics (SHWAT) Pro Staff Hunter and Professional Outdoor Media Association (POMA) member, I am demanding of the equipment I use. The extreme rigors I put gear through means I have to trust those products to survive my pursuits and perform flawlessly afterwards. The good news for me… and you is that OpticsPlanet offers a bipod that meets those demands – the Blackhawk! Sportster™ TraverseTrack™ Bipod.

Click here to visit OpticsPlanet.com!

The Blackhawk! Sportster™ TraverseTrack™ Bipod is the real deal! Like most sitting and kneeling position bipods, it’s adjustable to fit your sitting or kneeling height from 13.5 to 23 inches. Like many other bipods, it also includes adjustability on a vertical pivot but unlike some, you can lock down the vertical pivot position. While a vertical pivot is where some of best bipods end, it’s just the beginning for the Blackhawk! Sportster™ TraverseTrack™ Bipod I received last week. True to its name, a second swivel axis allows for horizontal rotation. This means I can effortlessly track and lead targets on a horizontal plane. This function would have equated to hogs on the ground instead of another missed opportunity if I had ordered it a few days earlier!

Click here to visit OpticsPlanet.com!More than vertical and horizontal adjustability, I love the Rapid-Adjust Lever Lock feature and easy installation. Even better for long predator and hog hunting excursions, especially in run-and-gun situations, this lightweight 18-ounce bipod is an easy tote. Did I know it was there? Sure. Did it bother me? No. My carry throughout the day was an easy haul.

Other positives I found on this bipod included easy installation and hunt-proven all-metal construction, spring-retractable tubular legs with slip resistant rubber feet, perfect for quick target acquisition on uneven terrain.

The only “con” (term used lightly) I found with the Blackhawk! Sportster™ TraverseTrack™ Bipod was in the tubular legs. I would love to see ribbed lower legs that further assist in ensuring level shooting; however, as a final thought, I can honestly say I have not experienced any negative consequence related to not having the ribs – it’s simply a personal preference. It certainly would never keep me from using this particular bipod.

Click here to visit OpticsPlanet.com!I spent some trigger time with the Blackhawk! Sportster™ TraverseTrack™ Bipod this weekend. Refreshing doesn’t begin to convey my excitement over this bipod. I engaged numerous targets throughout a horizontal plane without adjusting the bipod legs or my own body. I also tracked numerous critters during a sit in the woods; however, shot opportunities eluded me – not as a fault of this truly incredible bipod! The Blackhawk! Sportster™ TraverseTrack™ Bipod has taken its rightful place as my bipod of choice for future pursuits and I look forward to making good on those missed opportunities in the near future.