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Posts tagged “Bow hunting

Deer Hunting: Late Season is a Game Changer

By Kevin Reese

Christmas Credit Where It’s Due… Before we talk late season hunting, Kelly, Jacob and I would like to wish you and your families the merriest of Christmases this year. Our prayer through this holiday season is simply that you know, understand and embrace the Reason for the season. Make a simple birthday song your newest Christmas tradition. Santa is one cool cat but not nearly as awesome as the Lion and the Lamb. Give credit where it’s due this Christmas and commit random acts of kindness.

That said, let’s talk hunting…

Mike Kormos, Editor at the Corsicana Daily Sun, in Corsicana, TX, takes a nice 8-pt. buck!

Corsicana, Texas resident, Mike Kormos and a nice 8-Pt.

Late season deer hunting, fraught with the challenges of downright cold temps and bucks that have decided the nightlife is better for their health. Too often, it seems, deer lockdown after the rut, while does still dot the landscape on occasion, bucks have wised-up and don’t care nearly as much about the does as they did weeks earlier. Food sources change, too. Acorns are on the ground, others sources have dried up or gone… the changing season seems to change EVERTHING we know about deer hunting from the early season through the rut.

I often remind people that the definition of insanity is to do the same thing over and over and expect different results. Consistently hunting an area, or hunting it the same way is never a good idea; after all, if food sources, activity, temperatures and down-and-dirty deer behavior (rut) have all changed, why wouldn’t you change the way and places you hunt?

It’s easy for us to get stuck in a routine; it’s a path of least resistance – we don’t have to change anything – same Bat channel, same Bat time. Unfortunately the fault in our logic often is that as much as we think we have deer patterned, by mid-season they have likely patterned us; they know the paths we take to our stands or blinds and know where those setups are located. You might get the surprise of your life if you change the setup. More than once, simple changes have been the difference between seeing nothing… AGAIN, and killing the buck of a lifetime.

Consider trading in your regular spot for something less expected. Don’t be afraid to scout and find prospective areas during a quiet, scent controlled mid-day browse but stay away from known bedding areas and keep your bow or rifle with you – you just never know – stranger things have happened. Consider predominant winds when you find signs of deer activity like scat, scrapes, hoof prints, rubs, etc. Set up your blind or stand on the downwind side of observed activity. After setting up a stand or blind in a new location stay out of the area for several days, if possible, before returning to hunt.

Consider what it is exactly you are hunting over and whether interest in those food and water sources change as temperatures drop, acorns fall and the season progresses. How does the change from fall to winter alter activity and food sources? Are they rutting? Is that trail if front of your setup still used? Is water close by? Is it still their first or only choice? Use changes in weather and activity as the measuring stick you use to grade the effectiveness of your current position. Is it time to change your game? When deer have disappeared, your only option is to find out where they went.

Hunt funnels, pinch points, water sources, trails and areas with heavy acorn concentration or other desirable food sources; ask any hunter sitting over a feeder what happens when the acorns fall. In short, those changes must define where and how you hunt. Hunting over active sign as the season progresses makes infinitely more sense than sticking to the same old setup because you saw a buck working a scrape in early October. The lesson here is, “The only constant is change.”

A lack of success spanning the season can be more than frustrating; it can be downright mentally and physically draining. Human nature, if not kept in check, is to see your cup half empty. Pessimism is a hunter, too. It invades your thoughts and manipulates your decisions. Remember how many times Thomas Edison learned how NOT to make a light bulb? You may remember my pop’s best advice; I’ve made mention of it many times, “If you ask a thousand girls to dance, one of ’em’s gonna’ say, ‘Yes.’” There is nothing truer in our pursuit of wild game although there are times you must change the way you ask the question or approach the “girl”. Often, your biggest hurdle is yourself. Be a warrior against pessimism and a champion of tenacity. Attitude is everything; it either keeps you indoors or pushes you in the woods for another day of celebrating our outdoor heritage no matter the odds or the outcome. “You can’t win if you don’t play!” I’ll see you in the woods.

Hunt hard, hunt often.

TIPS FOR A GREAT HUNTING PHOTO: Be in natural settings, not in the back of a truck or a garage floor. Clean up as much blood as you can. RESPECT THE ANIMAL. Keep rifle barrels pointed away from people. Take the photo from a lower position… your deer will grow! Consider if you would frame the photo and place it on your mantle. If you would, great! If not, take the time to get it right.

Brian Beauchamp Buck 2014-sm

 


Dennis Dunn Hits the Bulls Eye with Barebow!

A quiet yet no less legendary bowhunter chronicles his incredible quest!

By Kevin Reese 

Looking back over my years as a bowhunter I’ve always had a fascination with heading outdoors with stick and string; in fact, even as a Cub Scout I remember how fun it was to fling arrows into giant bales of hay. As an adult I can honestly say that fervor has never left. I am just as committed to traditional sports as I ever was; actually, since taking on bowhunting in my early 30’s I can say my passion for archery has grown exponentially over simple target shooting. So much so that I found myself teaching bowhunting and archery seminars! I am truly an addict.

 

Beyond hunting, I am also passionate about the history and milestones richly present in our archery and bowhunting heritage. Names like Fred Bear, Glenn St. Charles, Saxton Pope, Ben Pearson, Pete Shepley, Gail Martin, Chuck Adams, Doug Easton, Ted Nugent and young icon, Fred Eichler, fascinate me to no end. Reading their stories, catching footage of their adventures on my television set or visiting with them at one of the increasing number of trade shows or conferences I attend only serves to fuel my desire to be the best I can be in the bowhunting realm; further, to leave a legacy for my sons that allow them to utter my name in outdoor industry circles without reservation. But, while those archers and their stories are nothing short of legendary, Dennis Dunn also quietly roams those ranks and should be considered shoulder to shoulder among them. Read on…

 

I met Dennis Dunn last year at my Professional Outdoor Media Association (POMA) conference. We spoke shortly after my arrival and I immediately recognized Dennis as one fitting the ranks of those named earlier. The more we talked the more I appreciated Dunn as a fellow bowhunter but I had no idea of the significance of his contribution to our bowhunting tradition until he mentioned a book he wrote. “It chronicles my 40-year quest for North America’s Big Game 29 with a barebow.” My jaw dropped. He noticed my excitement and asked if I would like to preview the book.

 

Dunn’s coffee table book, Barebow! An Archer’s Fair-Chase Taking of North America’s Big-Game 29, is a 504-page, 9-pound masterpiece! Barebow! took top honors in 2010, earning the prestigious, Mossy Oak sponsored Pinnacle Award for Best Book, at the Professional Outdoor Media Association’s (POMA – www.professionaloutdoormedia.org) annual conference.

 

In 2005, Dennis became the first bowhunter in history to complete the North American Super Slam with a barebow; a barebow is a long bow, recurve bow or compound bow void of any devices used for aiming; in short, archers and bowhunters refer to this style as instinct shooting. Since Dunn completed this feat in 2005, two others have now joined him in what is widely regarded as the most difficult challenge currently afforded modern day bowhunters.    

 

Dunn writing is vivid and fluid. He paints his adventures (and misadventures) with words that enveloped me and took me along on his quests. The imagery in text he creates throughout Barebow!’s pages is cinematic and grand in scope while black and white illustrations and full color paintings by world renowned wildlife artists Hayden and Dallen Lambson both fill and separate Dunn’s exploits; the father and son Lambson team contributed depictions of each of North America’s big 29 species, each one leading the reader into another of Dunn’s amazing stories. Barebow! is also filled with a comprehensive collection of Dunn’s personal photos, taken over the course of his 40-year quest. What you won’t find in Barebow! are photographs of Dunn posing with his trophies. One of his primary goals when authoring Barebow! was to create a treasure both hunters and non-hunters could enjoy. Currently, according to Dunn, one-third of his sales are to the non-hunting population. 

 

During his quest , many of Dennis’ trophies, 21 to be exact, landed upon the pages of Pope and Young’s record book while his the final trophy, a Grizzly Bear, taken in 2004 with an 8-yard heart shot, became the world record, measuring a hefty 26 5/16. The bear is currently housed at the Pope & Young Club/St. Charles Museum in Chatfield, Minnesota.

 

If you’re looking for something to sink your reading teeth into, jump on Barebow! It’s not just a book; it’s a treasure, a family heirloom! I feel profoundly lucky to own a copy of Barebow! Moreover, since meeting Dunn, reading his book and corresponding with him, I’m proud to call him a friend. Barebow! truly chronicles a legendary hunter’s hunger for that which no other had ever achieved and does much to promote our shrinking heritage. Reading Barebow! will give you a greater understanding of the hearts and minds of bowhunters past, present and future. Dunn exemplifies all that is good in bowhunting and strikes a bullseye in sharing it!

 

Barebow! is a must-own for bowhunters and a should-own for everyone else!

 

Barebow! An Archer’s Fair-Chase Taking of North America’s Big Game 29 may be found at www.str8arrows.com, www.Amazon.com, www.BarnesandNoble.com and many other places online. The book retails for $95; limited edition with author and artists’ signatures, gilt-edged pages, leather spine, slipcase box, and premium cloth cover is also available for $195.

 

Visit www.LambsonArt.com to learn more about the incredible artwork of father and son team Hayden and Dallen Lambson.  

 

Hunt hard, hunt often.


Dennis Dunn Hits the Bulls Eye with Barebow!

A quiet yet no less legendary bowhunter chronicles his incredible quest!

By Kevin Reese 

Looking back over my years as a bowhunter I’ve always had a fascination with heading outdoors with stick and string; in fact, even as a Cub Scout I remember how fun it was to fling arrows into giant bales of hay. As an adult I can honestly say that fervor has never left. I am just as committed to traditional sports as I ever was; actually, since taking on bowhunting in my early 30’s I can say my passion for archery has grown exponentially over simple target shooting. So much so that I found myself teaching bowhunting and archery seminars! I am truly an addict.

 

Beyond hunting, I am also passionate about the history and milestones richly present in our archery and bowhunting heritage. Names like Fred Bear, Glenn St. Charles, Saxton Pope, Ben Pearson, Pete Shepley, Gail Martin, Chuck Adams, Doug Easton, Ted Nugent and young icon, Fred Eichler, fascinate me to no end. Reading their stories, catching footage of their adventures on my television set or visiting with them at one of the increasing number of trade shows or conferences I attend only serves to fuel my desire to be the best I can be in the bowhunting realm; further, to leave a legacy for my sons that allow them to utter my name in outdoor industry circles without reservation. But, while those archers and their stories are nothing short of legendary, Dennis Dunn also quietly roams those ranks and should be considered shoulder to shoulder among them. Read on…

 

I met Dennis Dunn last year at my Professional Outdoor Media Association (POMA) conference. We spoke shortly after my arrival and I immediately recognized Dennis as one fitting the ranks of those named earlier. The more we talked the more I appreciated Dunn as a fellow bowhunter but I had no idea of the significance of his contribution to our bowhunting tradition until he mentioned a book he wrote. “It chronicles my 40-year quest for North America’s Big Game 29 with a barebow.” My jaw dropped. He noticed my excitement and asked if I would like to preview the book.

 

Dunn’s coffee table book, Barebow! An Archer’s Fair-Chase Taking of North America’s Big-Game 29, is a 504-page, 9-pound masterpiece! Barebow! took top honors in 2010, earning the prestigious, Mossy Oak sponsored Pinnacle Award for Best Book, at the Professional Outdoor Media Association’s (POMA – www.professionaloutdoormedia.org) annual conference.

 

In 2005, Dennis became the first bowhunter in history to complete the North American Super Slam with a barebow; a barebow is a long bow, recurve bow or compound bow void of any devices used for aiming; in short, archers and bowhunters refer to this style as instinct shooting. Since Dunn completed this feat in 2005, two others have now joined him in what is widely regarded as the most difficult challenge currently afforded modern day bowhunters.    

 

Dunn writing is vivid and fluid. He paints his adventures (and misadventures) with words that enveloped me and took me along on his quests. The imagery in text he creates throughout Barebow!’s pages is cinematic and grand in scope while black and white illustrations and full color paintings by world renowned wildlife artists Hayden and Dallen Lambson both fill and separate Dunn’s exploits; the father and son Lambson team contributed depictions of each of North America’s big 29 species, each one leading the reader into another of Dunn’s amazing stories. Barebow! is also filled with a comprehensive collection of Dunn’s personal photos, taken over the course of his 40-year quest. What you won’t find in Barebow! are photographs of Dunn posing with his trophies. One of his primary goals when authoring Barebow! was to create a treasure both hunters and non-hunters could enjoy. Currently, according to Dunn, one-third of his sales are to the non-hunting population. 

 

During his quest , many of Dennis’ trophies, 21 to be exact, landed upon the pages of Pope and Young’s record book while his the final trophy, a Grizzly Bear, taken in 2004 with an 8-yard heart shot, became the world record, measuring a hefty 26 5/16. The bear is currently housed at the Pope & Young Club/St. Charles Museum in Chatfield, Minnesota.

 

If you’re looking for something to sink your reading teeth into, jump on Barebow! It’s not just a book; it’s a treasure, a family heirloom! I feel profoundly lucky to own a copy of Barebow! Moreover, since meeting Dunn, reading his book and corresponding with him, I’m proud to call him a friend. Barebow! truly chronicles a legendary hunter’s hunger for that which no other had ever achieved and does much to promote our shrinking heritage. Reading Barebow! will give you a greater understanding of the hearts and minds of bowhunters past, present and future. Dunn exemplifies all that is good in bowhunting and strikes a bullseye in sharing it!

 

Barebow! is a must-own for bowhunters and a should-own for everyone else!

 

Barebow! An Archer’s Fair-Chase Taking of North America’s Big Game 29 may be found at www.str8arrows.com, www.Amazon.com, www.BarnesandNoble.com and many other places online. The book retails for $95; limited edition with author and artists’ signatures, gilt-edged pages, leather spine, slipcase box, and premium cloth cover is also available for $195.

 

Visit www.LambsonArt.com to learn more about the incredible artwork of father and son team Hayden and Dallen Lambson.  

 

Hunt hard, hunt often.