Keeping you connected to our outdoor heritage


Combat Focus Shooting: Resolve to Protect… and Survive

Kevin shooting5

By Kevin Reese

Glock2It’s no secret, stories of home invasions, car-jackings, armed robberies, murders, assaults and even domestic violence are never-ending and the themes, eerily familiar, as they relate to the victims’ inability to protect themselves in one way or another; often, for gun owners, the shortcoming is a lack of effective defensive training. This New Year’s I challenge you to a resolution. Rather than focusing as much as we do on weight, finances or the next big promotion, try something a bit more selfless and impactful. Resolve to be the protector… and survivor your family may depend upon. For me, this critical commitment was launched by Rob Pincus’ life-changing Combat Focus Shooting program; in fact, consider CFS, as it relates to ending threats and surviving, the gift that keeps on giving.

Kevin IwoJima93The basic premise of Combat Focus Shooting, like many training programs, is survivability. I was familiar with this logic, first, because I want to survive just as much as the next person and second, my extensive Marine Corps handgun training, through countless hours of instruction and range time, also preached the same – we just didn’t train the same. Unlike my military training and qualification with a 1911, and most other training programs, survivability, pursuant to Combat Focus Shooting, hinges on distinctly different cornerstones, chiefly among them, a balance of speed and precision, and beginning with fundamental principles of defensive handgun shooting; the operative word being “defensive”, shooters should certainly possess at least basic handgun experience and study which equipment is deemed most appropriate for defensive shooting – walk on the rocks I stumbled on! Let me explain…

As a professional in the hunting and shooting industry, I knew Rob in advance but had no concept of the premise of the I.C.E. Firearm Training Combat Focus Shooting program. Like most of my Marine Corps buddies who had trained and qualified (I proudly qualified Rifle Expert, 6th Award, and Pistol Sharpshooter) and, indeed, all veterans exposed to concentrated handgun training, I thought I knew precisely how to defend myself and what gear I needed to do it. Nothing could have been further from the truth.

My first CFS experience was to have Pincus condemn my holster before my first drill.

“Put this on.”

ICE RAC7He handed me a new I.C.E. RAC Kydex OWB Holster and I did as he instructed, quickly changing holsters and joining the rest of the class for “balance of speed and precision” drills. This is the overwhelming theme of Combat Focus Shooting and a primary factor in survivability. The rest comes from instinctive, aggressive movements both in firearm manipulation and sustained fire without ever losing sight of the threat. In Pincus’ words, “If you’re looking down you’re not focused on the threat and if you’re not moving, you just might stay that way. Simple as that.”

Like a broken record, “balance of speed and precision” played on through every intense, physically grueling exercise from repeated, advanced versions of our first online drill to exhausting live-fire wind sprints and unnerving high-stress figure-eight drills. After two full days and 1,000 rounds of mentally and physically intense training, we survived. Of course, it’s worth noting the I.C.E. Kydex holster was a complete game-changer – the best I’ve ever used and still on my belt.

By the close of training, I was battered and bruised with rock-tape, expertly applied by CFS Instructor, Alessandro Padovani, running its X-pattern of support down the length of my strong-arm but I never broke… only persevered, learned and earned. I learned that before Combat Focus Shooting when I thought, as a concealed carrier, I knew everything I needed to in order to protect my family, I actually knew very little. I learned that the best way to protect my family is to train to stop a threat and survive to do it again if need be. Sadly, I also learned my beloved Marine Corps does not adequately equip my brothers-and-sisters in arms with training conducive to engaging an active shooter and surviving the experience.

CFS Coin6After training, Rob asked how I felt about Combat Focus Shooting. I chewed on his question for a moment, never truly answering. How does someone sum up a life-changing gift like CFS training in words that do it justice? You don’t. I was elated to have graduated the course, the prized CFS coin in hand, but my emotions were mixed. While elation was present so was humility and sadness. It wasn’t enough to acknowledge I knew much less than I thought, or even that personally, CFS was impactful beyond measure. I struggled with memories of the inadequate combat-focused handgun training I received as a Marine and that I suppose is still a disheartening reality.

At this time of year, when we search high and low for the right resolution to add depth and breadth to our lives, why not consider becoming the protector… and indeed the survivor, in the event of a threat, you are called to be? What better gift to your family is there than survivability? It truly is the gift that keeps on giving.

CFS TargetAB-2CFS TargetC-2Side note – Balance of Speed and Precision is a simple concept. When engaging a threat your primary focus should never be precision accuracy, nor should it be to spray bullets in the actor’s general direction. Your best strategy for stopping an aggressor is somewhere in the middle, what Pincus refers to as the balance of speed and precision. Your goal should be to fire as rapidly as possible while maintaining a reasonable degree of accuracy; that is to say, keep your shots contained in an area referred to as the high-center chest.

CFS_Logo_GreenSpecial thanks to Combat Focus Shooting’s expert instructors Rob Pincus, Alessandro Padovani, Ken Crawford and Michael John Lowe, as well as fellow students and range hosts, Ken and Maggie Ortega.

I_C_E-Firearms-Training-Logo2Visit I.C.E. Firearm Training at or the Combat Focus Shooting website at for more training information and scheduled classes. More information about the best OWB holster I’ve ever used, Pincus’ personally designed I.C.E. RAC Kydex Holster can be found here at and in the following video. The I.C.E. RAC Holster can be purchased at I.C.E. Training ( or Global Outfitters (

More information can also be found in the following video:

Meat Eaters R’ Us

FRESH perspective on the food chain

By Kevin Reese

To All HuntersAs an outdoor writer, photographer, videographer and speaker in the outdoor industry I’ve successfully made work out of hunting; unfortunately, I’ve been so busy writing about hunting recently, that I haven’t had many opportunities to hunt at all. My outdoor work is finally starting to wind down but deer season is all but over and only two whitetails fell victim to my stick and string.

It’s also worth mentioning that I’m so immersed in outdoor communications that I don’t watch very many hunting shows at all – a bricklayer doesn’t want to lay bricks then go home and watch bricklaying on television, even if that his is life’s passion.

That said, I do have a guilty pleasure. I’m addicted to Duck Dynasty. Worse, I created a couple of other addicts; my wife and son can’t get enough. We even blew duck calls at midnight on New Year’s Eve. I must admit I was the only one in the family that actually sounded like a duck; of course, I’m also the only duck hunter in our family so I suppose the gross difference in calling technique wasn’t such an anomaly.

During a recent family viewing, Jase Robertson echoed my sentiments, “I don’t like grocery store meat. It scares me.” Disliking purchased meat has less to do with taste and much more to do with the disassociation it creates between us and the brutal reality we call the food chain. A perfect example of this tragic circumstance was sent to me via email years ago. The email was simple, “LOL” with an attached image. Opening the image I found a newspaper clipping that read, “You ought to go to the store and buy the meat that was made there, where no animals were harmed.” Sadly, the same person that submitted that gem also votes.

Newsflash – ALL meat comes from living things; in fact, all food sources come from living things whether directly or indirectly – meat, fruit, veggies, all of it. Wouldn’t you rather take an active role Click here for more information on The Mindful Carnivore!in what you provide for your family? Like my hunting brothers and sisters, I choose to take an active, responsible role in providing sustenance. Where most people live in that disconnect, we are intimately, blood-under-the-fingernails aware of our role and the significance of taking life to sustain life.

With the close of deer season, it seems that your backwoods grocery store is locking its doors, making for a pretty dismal postseason outlook for meat-seating hunter’s throughout our region, and soon, across the nation. The last time I checked I didn’t see coyote or bobcat entrees littering restaurant menus. For many, hunting is over until spring, full freezers or not.  But living in our Lone Star state, especially here in our area, provides infinite opportunities to stock freezers year round.

With an estimated 2 to 3 million feral hogs rooting up the neighborhood, it’s safe to say we are overrun. The bad news is that feral hogs predate bird eggs (including quail, turkey, and others) and other small and young animals, including other hogs. Rooting also causes immense damage to land as hogs root for grubs, roots, shoots and other tasty morsels in the soil. Rooting injures livestock, destroys farm and ranch machinery, and negatively impacts both the landscape and our fragile ecosystem, especially where other wildlife are concerned.

Kevin Reese rootingOver $400 million in damage is caused annually in Texas alone by feral hogs. They are not native but invasive and compete with indigenous Texas wildlife like whitetail deer for more than just food sources, but habitat as a whole – and, they are winning.

So, what does that mean for red blooded, meat eating, conservation minded hunters? It means hunting feral hogs is not only fun, it helps combat a real problem! Even better, that freezer of yours, hungry for packages of organic red meat, can be fed year round. There are no bag limits or time constraints. Hunt day or night, seven days a week if you’ve got the time. Dust off your britches, pick up your rifle or bow and go hunt. With our feral hog population Corsicana freezers have a bright, bright future.

Hunt hard, hunt often.

Click here to visit!


Tactical Hunting: Sir, Yes, Sir!

Much to the dismay of piers morgan, diane Feinstein and willie nelson

(names intentionally not capitalized out of respect… or lack thereof)

By Kevin Reese

BR10-smMy pop once told me I might fit into my dress blues if I used bungee cords; the truth hurts. Looking at me it’s hard to believe I spent eight years in the Marines. In all honestly, I’m not that bad off… I’m just not that well off; I could stand a few months of nonstop treadmill work. Beyond reminiscing about my life as a Marine and wishing I still looked the part, I miss many aspects of active duty life – chief among them being camaraderie and my trusty M-16 A2 Service Rifle.

I wasn’t a huge promoter of 62-grain 5.56 Ball NATO ammunition but it seemed to be sufficient. I qualified every year as a rifle expert and later in my second enlistment as a pistol sharpshooter, qualifying with an original Colt 1911 that had been in Marine Corps service for over 75 years and was still a sweet shooter.

Kevin 3d SRIG-editedAssimilating to civilian life, including civilian shooting was a tall order. On the firing line, I had difficulty adjusting to traditional hunting rifles. I began looking at AR-15 rifles to regain that comfort level I had with my M-16 A2. As an avid hunter on an extremely tight budget, I recall how badly I wanted to purchase one of the Colt AR-15’s I drooled over as I passed by them in the PX. It looked exactly like my M-16 but was semi-automatic; it even had the bayonet stud. Perhaps I arrived at my justification before my time but I thought, back in the late 80’s, the AR-15 would make a great hunting rifle. Certainly, when I was honorably discharged in 1996 and searching for that comfort level I had achieved with my M-16 A2, the AR-15 was my only reasonable option.

chriskevinSeveral years ago, good friend and fellow Marine Corps veteran, Chris Reed, History Channel’s Top Shot season 2 winner, talked about his desire to do more tactical-styled hunting. We talked about tactical hunting often and he eventually restored my fervor for AR platform rifles, something I hadn’t experienced in years. I had been too immersed in bowhunting to stop and realize my passion for modern sporting rifles had slowed to a low-crawl. in the end, I can thank Chris for drawing that passion back to the surface once again, this time for the long haul.

Long range Bolt Action by Kevin ReeseWhile I still bowhunt religiously, I have expanded once again to rifle shooting. My CZ-USA Model 3 .300 WSM is back in the game and more importantly, so is my Smith & Wesson (S&W) MP15T Tactical 5.56. For long range shooting, my Alpen Apex 6-24x50mm scope is the only way to go and I’ve dialed my S&W MP15T Tactical in at 600 yards; however, here in Texas most shots are much closer and my routine hog hunting is predominantly at night.

That said, my AimPoint H34S Hunter is the perfect lowlight/night optic for hunting and shooting within 300 yards and now rests atop my AR-15. The Alpen Apex scope, trusted for long distances precision accuracy, reclaimed its 600+ yard throne to reign over my CZ-USA . Both are topped with HHA Optimizer Horizon mounts. The Horizon allows me to calibrate for bullet drop out to 600 yards and is incredibly accurate. Once the Horizon is calibrated I simply dial in the range within 5 yards, up to 600 yards out, and put the crosshairs on target; there is no need for hold-over or mil-dots. I’ve also outfitted my S&W MP15T with a Crimson Trace Rail Master CMR-201 Laser smithwessonmp15t-2and Hawglite Helios H250. The Helios H250 is a rail-mounted lighting system with a remote switch that delivers a blinding red, green or white led light with a remote switch I’ve attached to the handguard. I also ordered a Harris bipod from Brownell’s to round out my tactical hunting rifle and have since set out on a series of new adventures that send memories of days gone by flooding back into my brain-housing-group.

Like many of our Sportsman Elite loyalist, I cut my teeth shooting every can I could as a kid and honed my skills with military training that has carried over well into my hunting success. More importantly, it broadened my perspective on modern sporting rifles like the AR-15 and the diverse ways we can employ them for self-defense as well as recreational shooting and hunting.

smithwessonmp15tI’ve heard arguments on both sides of the fence, from Piers Morgan backers like Willie Nelson who believes semi-automatic AR-15’s should only be used by military and police (I’ve since thrown all my Willie albums in the trash – sorry I just can’t stomach his position on gun ontrol!), to the well-thought-out ideology of our Lone Star State Senator, Ted Cruz, who educated a nearly catatonic diane feinstein on the differences between a semi-automatic rifle that happens to be black and a bolt action rifle… rather the lack of differences between them!

BHbipod5My pop also once told me “You’ve got to stand for something or you’ll fall for anything” – well, he told me many things and I tried to remember the important ones. This is an issue I do take a stand on. I choose to roll my eyes and the irresponsible of ramblings of people like Morgan, Nelson and feinstein (I never dreamed that I would group Willie with California’s waste of a senate seat – Willie’s always been wasted anyway) while I stand with my brothers-and-sisters-in-arms who undoubtedly would love to venture into the hunting woods with an AR-platform rifle that, while offering only a single-shot firing option, does cater to those creature comforts we identify with through service to our beloved country. It’s also worth mentioning that a while back, California senator, Leland Yee, a staunch supporter of gun control even arguing for outright gun bans was arrested and indicted on serious gun-trafficking charges. What’s wrong with that picture?

Read more about Senator Yee here:

So, what’s my message to my fellow Navarro County hunters and shooting enthusiasts on AR-15’s and other modern sporting rifles in the woods? Take ‘em if you got ‘em! I choose to unify our front rather than divide our ranks with ignorant rhetoric and feinstein fascism. I suppose my position came with the commitment to uphold our Second Amendment, along with every other word in the Constitution, unlike some other folks. Of course, I also happen to believe an AR-15 is perfect for more than personal defense, it’s also great for hog and predator hunting!

comeandtakeitThat “Come and take it” perspective was born from military training and the knowledge that “we the people” rule the roost. Equally as important, it came from my proactive approach to real freedom. Whether you choose to shoot a bow, bolt action rifle, AR-15, 1911, revolver, muzzleloader or even Crosman’s ridiculously cool Benjamin Rogue .357-Caliber Air Rifle, get out there and do it! While you’re out there, thank every past and present warrior in our nation’s illustrious history for preserving your right to do so!

Hunt hard, hunt often and hunt with a modern sporting rifle like the AR-15, or better yet, with an ol’ Remington 700 BDL .300 resurrected with a McRees Prescision BR10 Chassis if that’s what turns your rotors! Whatever you choose, just get out there, enjoy God’s creation and eat well.


A standard Remington bolt action rifle fitted with a HUNT READY McRees Precision BR10 Chassis (



Avoid Duck Decoy Tangles with Decoy Buddy

Click here to visit Decoy Buddy online!Any duck hunter who has been at this great pursuit for any length of time has experienced the exasperation of dealing with hopelessly tangled decoys.

Duck hunting is hard work, no doubt about it. Just getting to a duck hole is often a rigorous adventure, whether it’s a dark-of-night boat ride or a long trudge in waders pulling mud through chest-deep water. Then it’s time to set the decoy spread. All that time spent in the garage the night before the hunt, carefully wrapping decoy lines, securing anchors and bagging the dekes… a waste of time. With shooting light approaching and the sound of wings overhead, you’re still trying to untangle decoys.

Click here to visit Decoy Buddy online!Decoy Buddy, by Game Smart, is a weighted 8-ounce reel that hooks onto your
floating decoy. Simply pull out the amount of line needed for the depth of water you
are hunting, and toss out the decoy. No wasted time unwinding decoy lines, and best of all, no tangled mess of decoy lines to deal with in the dark.

Decoy Buddy also makes picking up decoys easy. Simply reel in the slack with the
built-in knobs, or use a removable handle that floats just in case it is dropped in the

The Decoy Buddy was created by duck hunters and has evolved after years of trial
and development. It offers a balance of dependability to last many hunting seasons
and convenience that will spoil serious waterfowl hunters used to hard work in the
swamps and marshes.

The Decoy Buddy includes two holes for attaching accessories, and the anchor has teeth for a better hold on the bottom in windy conditions and currents.

The Decoy Buddy is available in 12- and 36-packs, or you can try a 3-pack for just

Visit for more information and to place an order, or ask for
Decoy Buddy at your local retailer.

Deer Hunting: Late Season is a Game Changer

By Kevin Reese

Christmas Credit Where It’s Due… Before we talk late season hunting, Kelly, Jacob and I would like to wish you and your families the merriest of Christmases this year. Our prayer through this holiday season is simply that you know, understand and embrace the Reason for the season. Make a simple birthday song your newest Christmas tradition. Santa is one cool cat but not nearly as awesome as the Lion and the Lamb. Give credit where it’s due this Christmas and commit random acts of kindness.

That said, let’s talk hunting…

Mike Kormos, Editor at the Corsicana Daily Sun, in Corsicana, TX, takes a nice 8-pt. buck!

Corsicana, Texas resident, Mike Kormos and a nice 8-Pt.

Late season deer hunting, fraught with the challenges of downright cold temps and bucks that have decided the nightlife is better for their health. Too often, it seems, deer lockdown after the rut, while does still dot the landscape on occasion, bucks have wised-up and don’t care nearly as much about the does as they did weeks earlier. Food sources change, too. Acorns are on the ground, others sources have dried up or gone… the changing season seems to change EVERTHING we know about deer hunting from the early season through the rut.

I often remind people that the definition of insanity is to do the same thing over and over and expect different results. Consistently hunting an area, or hunting it the same way is never a good idea; after all, if food sources, activity, temperatures and down-and-dirty deer behavior (rut) have all changed, why wouldn’t you change the way and places you hunt?

It’s easy for us to get stuck in a routine; it’s a path of least resistance – we don’t have to change anything – same Bat channel, same Bat time. Unfortunately the fault in our logic often is that as much as we think we have deer patterned, by mid-season they have likely patterned us; they know the paths we take to our stands or blinds and know where those setups are located. You might get the surprise of your life if you change the setup. More than once, simple changes have been the difference between seeing nothing… AGAIN, and killing the buck of a lifetime.

Consider trading in your regular spot for something less expected. Don’t be afraid to scout and find prospective areas during a quiet, scent controlled mid-day browse but stay away from known bedding areas and keep your bow or rifle with you – you just never know – stranger things have happened. Consider predominant winds when you find signs of deer activity like scat, scrapes, hoof prints, rubs, etc. Set up your blind or stand on the downwind side of observed activity. After setting up a stand or blind in a new location stay out of the area for several days, if possible, before returning to hunt.

Consider what it is exactly you are hunting over and whether interest in those food and water sources change as temperatures drop, acorns fall and the season progresses. How does the change from fall to winter alter activity and food sources? Are they rutting? Is that trail if front of your setup still used? Is water close by? Is it still their first or only choice? Use changes in weather and activity as the measuring stick you use to grade the effectiveness of your current position. Is it time to change your game? When deer have disappeared, your only option is to find out where they went.

Hunt funnels, pinch points, water sources, trails and areas with heavy acorn concentration or other desirable food sources; ask any hunter sitting over a feeder what happens when the acorns fall. In short, those changes must define where and how you hunt. Hunting over active sign as the season progresses makes infinitely more sense than sticking to the same old setup because you saw a buck working a scrape in early October. The lesson here is, “The only constant is change.”

A lack of success spanning the season can be more than frustrating; it can be downright mentally and physically draining. Human nature, if not kept in check, is to see your cup half empty. Pessimism is a hunter, too. It invades your thoughts and manipulates your decisions. Remember how many times Thomas Edison learned how NOT to make a light bulb? You may remember my pop’s best advice; I’ve made mention of it many times, “If you ask a thousand girls to dance, one of ’em’s gonna’ say, ‘Yes.’” There is nothing truer in our pursuit of wild game although there are times you must change the way you ask the question or approach the “girl”. Often, your biggest hurdle is yourself. Be a warrior against pessimism and a champion of tenacity. Attitude is everything; it either keeps you indoors or pushes you in the woods for another day of celebrating our outdoor heritage no matter the odds or the outcome. “You can’t win if you don’t play!” I’ll see you in the woods.

Hunt hard, hunt often.

TIPS FOR A GREAT HUNTING PHOTO: Be in natural settings, not in the back of a truck or a garage floor. Clean up as much blood as you can. RESPECT THE ANIMAL. Keep rifle barrels pointed away from people. Take the photo from a lower position… your deer will grow! Consider if you would frame the photo and place it on your mantle. If you would, great! If not, take the time to get it right.

Brian Beauchamp Buck 2014-sm


The I.C.E. RAC Kydex Holster: Range and Carry Holsters’ Finest Hour

How much innovation can you fit in I.C.E. Training’s new personal defense holster? Maybe enough to save a life!

By Kevin Reese

I_C_E-Firearms-Training-Logo2As someone licensed to carry a concealed firearm, with a ridiculous number of hours of handgun and shooting training over eight years of Marine Corps service and of course, concealed-carry training under my belt, I thought I was well-equipped for personal defense and survivability; I was wrong. I showed up to personal defense expert, Rob Pincus’ two-day Combat Focus Shooting training with a soft-sided outside the waistband (OWB) holster complete with Velcro strap, my Glock 17 Generation 4 and 1,000 rounds of my personal favorite factory ammunition, Federal’s American Eagle.

Just as quickly as I walked onto the pistol range, Rob Pincus himself escorted me back to the prep table. He didn’t smile or say much at all. He simply un-holstered my handgun and asked me to remove my holster. As I removed my personal holster, he handed me a new I.C.E. Range and Carry (RAC) Kydex Holster and instructed me to put it on, re-holster and join the other students for the morning’s training brief.

ICE-RAC Holster-smWhile I was familiar with molded holsters, including the one I owned for my standard-framed Glock 20 Gen 1, I was not a huge fan. In my experience many had clumsy releases I always fumbled with during drawing exercises. While I’ll acknowledge that showing up with such a poor excuse for a training holster and having it changed out in front of the class was a bit embarrassing (no one has ever accused Rob Pincus of being shy) I later counted it as the most positive equipment change I could recall in all of my handgun training experience.

During my Combat Focus Shooting training, I fired over 850 rounds with an average of four shots per repetition. Crunching numbers revealed I rapidly drew and holstered my Glock 17 Gen 4 at least 200 times without a single glance down to my side. Doing so or fumbling would have resulted in compromising drills and losing sight of my targets, especially during wind-sprint and figure-eight drills.

My first observation of the I.C.E. RAC Kydex Holster is that while it hugged my Glock and kept it passively secure, there was no inhibiting release mechanism. The result was a seamless, lightning-quick draw every time; in fact, my draw was more efficient than ever before! The outer wall is also shorter allowing for quicker clearing out of the holster, although the trigger assembly and magazine release are still protected. Throughout over 200 drawing and holstering repetitions, the holster’s passive grip design significantly improved vertical drawing and forward driving of my gun into a firing position.

rolled lip court ICEI.C.E.’s RAC holster also integrates a higher sweat guard against my body and rolled-back upper edge from front to back, something I’ve never seen on competing models, although I’m sure others will attempt to emulate this innovative feature. The rolled upper edge, combined with raised sweat guard keeps the gun higher and closer to my body while creating a funnel to accept my handgun in a safer, more vertical and efficient manner; I don’t have to fish for the opening like many holsters that may cause an unsafe habit of pointing the barrel towards my hip to avoid a collision with the holster’s top edge. Tins innovative design allowed for seamless, efficient holstering as quickly as I could possibly holster my handgun. From the beginning, I had never holstered more efficiently than with the I.C.E. RAC holster. The fact still holds true today.

The I.C.E. RAC Kydex Holster was easy to install on my belt with the molded belt loops and wide platform and with 80-percent of the gun’s contour to the holster’s exterior face, it was comfortable all day long. Considering the extreme drills and physical movement I encountered throughout Combat Focus Shooting training, I can’t recall a single uncomfortable moment or instance of impeded mobility; at least, not from the holster although I’m sure I wasn’t the only one taking a few Ibuprofin in the evening! But, then again Rob Pincus doesn’t pull any punches. Your joints might hurt but survivability… and Combat Focus Shooting bragging rights are worth it.

I also noted minimal protrusion of my Glock 17 from the bottom of the holster. This open design still protected my handgun in any position while allowing for variations in length. For example, I can carry a Glock 17 and Glock 19 in the same holster.

Since the moment Mr. Pincus asked me to put it on, it’s been the only OWB holster I’ve carried. Simply put, while it’s certainly not the most expensive OWB holster I’ve owned, I’m a huge fan. Of course, after two days with Rob Pincus, I would expect nothing less than near-perfect “awesomeness”. His quest for perfection is about protecting what’s most important – truth be told, it’s not your handgun but this holster might disagree. Yes, it’s that good.

MSRP for the I.C.E. RAC Kydex Holster is $59.99 and, in my opinion, worth every penny.

To learn more about the I.C.E. RAC Kydex Holster and other great personal defense gear, visit the I.C.E. Firearm and Personal Defense Training Store at

Click here to watch a video about the I.C.E. RAC Kydex Holster (

CFS_Logo_GreenTo learn more about Rob Pincus’ life-changing Combat Focus Shooting personal defense courses, visit

Boone and Crockett Introduces New President

MISSOULA, Mont. (Dec. 22, 2014) – A hunter, angler and businessman, Morrie Stevens Sr. of Saginaw, Mich., has been elected president of America’s first conservation organization, the Boone and Crockett Club.

For over 127 years, Club members have helped shape the scientific, educational, political, economic,social, technological and environmental forces affecting natural resource conservation.

Click here to visit Boone and Crockett online!As the Clubs 31st president, Stevens follows the tenure of Bill Demmer of Lansing, Mich., Stevens is chairman and CEO of Stevens Worldwide Van Lines headquartered in Saginaw. He is also involved in other nonprofit boards and is a member of Trout Unlimited, Pheasants Forever, Ducks Unlimited, Quality Deer Management, National Wild Turkey Federation, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, Ruffed Grouse Society and the NRA.

“As a lifelong hunter-conservationist, Morrie has served the Club tirelessly in multiple capacities,” said outgoing president Demmer. “Morrie was instrumental in guiding the development of our conservation education programs and will be a powerful force continuing the Club’s legacy in wildlife conservation at the local, regional and national level.”

Before being elected president, Stevens served in various Club officer positions, most recently as executive vice president of conservation, which directs the Club’s endowed university professorship and research fellowship programs across the country. Being a graduate of Michigan State University, Stevens worked with other Club members in establishing the MSU Boone and Crockett endowed chair of wildlife conservation, which now will become the Michigan State University Boone and Crockett Quantitative Wildlife Center.

Stevens said, “Preserving our American hunting heritage is something very personal to me. I grew up on a farm in rural Michigan on the Tittabawassee River, where at an early age I enjoyed hunting, fishing and trapping in the ’50s. What I learned being outdoors has served me well. Today we simply have too many obstacles for our kids to be outdoors, and something very special will be lost if we can’t remove these barriers. Of greatest concern is who will be our future conservationists? Our wildlife and the habitats that support them will need all the advocates they can get. Personal experiences in the outdoors are therefore foundational to future wildlife conservation efforts.”

He added, “Equally important is the focus of scientific management to supersede the more recent trends of judicial management. This begins with educating the next generation of conservation leaders. We also need to continually promote the shared use of public lands and promote good stewardship of private lands. There will need to be an increased level of collaboration of like-minded groups and innovative policies to address these challenges.”

Stevens concluded, “I can assure you the Boone and Crockett Club will do its part. We will maintain the Club’s historic legacy of thought leadership in promoting good government policy as it relates to wild game and its habitat, and sportsmen’s access to these resources. We will continue to seek and distribute new knowledge to guide critical decisions. We will also continue to educate the public and help them understand the historic role and contributions of the hunting and angling community in promoting and funding conservation of our wildlife and public lands for everyone’s enjoyment.”

In addition to the B&C university program at Michigan State, similar programs are established at the University of Montana, Texas A&M and research fellowships at Texas A&M Kingsville, University of Wisconsin at Stevens Point and Oregon State University.

About the Boone and Crockett Club  

North America’s first hunting and conservation organization, the Boone and Crockett Club was founded by Theodore Roosevelt in 1887. Its mission is to provide the leadership, stewardship and education needed to promote the conservation and management of wildlife, especially big game and its habitat, to preserve and encourage hunting and to maintain the highest ethical standards of fair chase and sportsmanship. Join us at

Cam-O-Bunk Bunk Bed Cot System Rises to the Top of Outdoor Sleeping

By Kevin Reese

Photoscape samplePursuing my passion outdoors as a lover of God’s creation, avid hunter, seasoned outdoor communicator and even, as you’ll see, a speaker, still leads to many primitive camping opportunities. Whether my assignments and adventures (often one in the same) lead to remote hunting trips, fishing excursions or just plain camping, I love it most in the company of others, especially my family. Each year, I also look forward to CrossTImbers’ Family Archery Adventure Camp in near Norman, Oklahoma, where most of us camp primitively and some of us are blessed to teach archery, shooting and hunting seminars to the young campers and their parents. It was in preparation for this camp recently, along with the knowledge that this time I would be sharing tent space with my younger brother, James Reese, and pseudo-brother, Brian Magee, from Fired Up Outdoors TV that I began a search for gear that I thought either might make us more comfortable or at least accommodate the three of us with a substantial amount of camping and instructional gear. My search landed me at where I quickly found the Cam-O-Bunk XL. As soon as the web page populated I knew I had found something amazing.

camobunk8One of the most amazing, innovative camping products I’ve come across in all of my outdoor years, Disc-O-Bed’s Cam-O-Bunk XL Bunk Bed Cot System rises above the “cot-petition” if there is any to be had, and “stacks up” comfort better than any camp bedding I’ve ever come across, especially considering eight years of gritty, active duty Marine Corps living!

I received my Disc-O-Bed Cam-O-Bunk Cot System just days before the family adventure camp, not as a result of slow shipping, Dis-O-Bed was incredibly responsive; rather, as a result of ordering at the last moment. I did not have time to unpack or inspect it before leaving, I simply loaded the soft carrying cases with rest of my gear and headed north.

camobunk3Upon arriving at the campground and picking the perfect spot, I pulled the soft cases out, laid them on the ground and opened them up. The contents were packed and protected incredibly well with detailed assembly instructions on top. The frame pieces are comprised of heavy-duty anti-rust, powder coated steel components; honestly, there wasn’t a scratch to be found. I studied the instructions for a few minute and began building. I erected the first cot, then the second, stacked them in the tent and had them tethered less than 10 minutes after I had retrieved them from my truck. I couldn’t have asked for an easier-to-assemble, better fitting system!

camobunk2While the Cam-O-Bunk is quite roomy, boasting mat dimensions of 79-in. x 34.5-in., I was amazed at how compactly it fit into my Browning Camping Black Canyon tent; we had tons of extra room for our gear! The Cam-O-Bunk also features a rolled steel base to protect ground sinking and damage to tent floors and other surfaces.

My first night in the Cam-O-Bunk, after a long evening of bowfishing on a nearby lake, was one of incomparable camp comfort. At 44, camp sleep often comes with a few aches and pain the next morning; however, the way the cot’s 600-denier material held fast yet fit the contour of my body had me feeling as rested as I’ve ever felt. We even took in an afternoon nap – tent windows open, cool breeze blowing through – it was a slice of heaven I don’t often get to experience, or generally cared to, given previous camp-sleep experiences. After the nap, we converted this bunk bed cot system into a comfortable camp couch. Yes, we were the only folks in camp with a couch in our tent! Does it get any cooler than a couch in your tent? No, it doesn’t.

If I sound excited, I am! As a Marine Corps veteran, I immediately realized Cam-O-Bunks value well beyond a simple campsite. Disc-O-Bed has developed a product primitive or temporary medical, humanitarian or military quarters; hunting, fishing and camping outfitters; emergency or human services shelters; youth camps; extra bedding at home when the relatives drop in for the holidays, etc.

Looking high and low for something I didn’t like about Disc-O-Bed’s Cam-O-Bunk XL Bunk Bed Cot System was futile. The only worthwhile mention is weight. The entire system weighs about 60 pounds. While I wouldn’t suggest backpacking everywhere with it, Cam-O-Bunk is compact, easy to carry and even easier to transport.

camobunk4Disc-O-Bed also offers an array of great accessories, including a cabinet, footlocker, mosquito net, polypropylene mat, IV stand, extenders to create more space between bunks, and other innovative accessories. My system included side organizers that attach easily to the sides of each cot and provide more than enough room for my Glock 17, flashlight, smartphone, tablet, beverage, a good book and much more.

The Disc-O-Bed Cam-O-Bunk has taken its rightful place alongside my favorite outdoor gear. I can’t imagine spending another night in camp without it!

For more information about the Cam-O-Bunk XL and Disc-O-Bed’s other innovative products, visit

The Bass Pros Features Top Anglers and Best Bass Fishing Tips on TV

For Immediate Release – Dec. 18, 2014

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. — If you want to fish like a rock star, there’s no better place to learn bass fishing tips than The Bass Pros, which airs on Outdoor Channel Sundays at 3:30 p.m., Tuesdays at 2:00 p.m., and Thursdays at noon Eastern time. Viewers can learn from the world’s leading anglers including Kevin VanDam, Edwin Evers, Rick Clunn, Tim Horton, Ott Defoe, Stacey King, and Brian Snowden.

For eight straight years, bass fishermen have found The Bass Pros to be one of the best shows on TV.  Now, season nine promises to deliver again. When it comes to bass fishing on television, this is the best place to learn how to catch more fish and make your time on the water more productive and fun.

Every episode of The Bass Pros features four to five top anglers who share their secrets for catching more big bass. The show features insightful segments such as In-Depth, which drills into the details to improve your fishing, and Fishin’-in-Five, a rapid-fire segment with the latest tips and current trends. Plus, Bass 101 provides solid advice for novice anglers and those who know their way around a rod and reel.

Tune into The Bass Pros and make sure you record it, too. This show is packed with so many fishing tips, you’ll want to rewind it and watch it again and again. Check out The Bass Pros video clip to get a taste of the fishing advice you can expect to see:

About Bass Pro Shops®
Bass Pro Shops®, which specializes in outdoor fun, operates 90 retail stores and Tracker Marine Centers across America and Canada that are visited by more than 120 million people every year. Bass Pro Shops stores, many of which feature restaurants, offer hunting, fishing, camping and other outdoor gear while their catalogs and website serve shoppers throughout the world. The company’s Tracker Marine Group® (, a leading brand of fishing boats for more than 36 years, manufactures and sells a variety of boats for fishing and cruising. Family fun is on tap at Bass Pro Shops resort Big Cedar Lodge® (, voted number six by Travel + Leisure Magazine as World’s Best Hotels for Families. For more information, visit  To request a free catalog, call 1-800-BASS PRO.  Follow us on Facebook at

Visit Bass Pro Shops online!

Media Contact:
Tammy Sapp

Browning Grants Signature Products Group (SPG) The Browning Pack License


For more Information:
Contact Andrew Howard (573) 898-3422

Signature Products Group (SPG) is proud to announce that starting January 1, 2015 they will be the official pack licensee for Browning. For 2015, SPG will unveil a completely new line of packs holding true to the Browning tradition of “The Best There Is.”

“We are thrilled to be taking on another Browning license. We’re especially excited to provide Browning hunting packs that reach the level of quality and performance that hunters expect. We have incorporated new innovative designs, materials, and features that live up to the Browning brand,” said SPG CEO, Dusty Zundel.

The brand new Browning Pack line will use Hypo-sonic™ and Mountain Crawler™ systems never before seen on the market. These systems focus on allowing the hunter to go farther, longer and faster.

“Our completely new line of Browning packs and bags were designed for hunters, by hunters.  We’re very excited to showcase all the innovations and features, many of which should change the market,” said Sales Manager, Geoff Maki. “We’re confident hunters everywhere will love this line…because your pack shouldn’t limit your hunt!”

The Browning Packs in the new line include a variety of day packs, lumbar packs, dry bags, dry duffels, luggage, a frame pack, map cases and casual backpacks.

Individual pack announcements will be available in 2015.

SPG is the official licensee of products for Browning®, Realtree®, Mossy Oak®, Ducks Unlimited®, Major League Bowhunter, Under Armour®, Dirty Bird™, Bone Collector®, Hard Core™, and Big Rack.

For more information on SPG , please visit